Inscribed and Circumscribed

In geometry, a circumscribed sphere of a polyhedron is a sphere that contains the polyhedron and touches each of the polyhedron’s vertices. The word circumsphere is sometimes used to mean the same thing. When it exists, a circumscribed sphere need not be the smallest sphere containing the polyhedron; for instance, the tetrahedron formed by a vertex of a cube and its three neighbors has the same circumsphere as the cube itself, but can be contained within a smaller sphere having the three neighboring vertices on its equator. Read more on – Wikipedia
In geometry, an inscribed planar shape or solid is one that is enclosed by and “fits snugly” inside another geometric shape or solid. To say that “Figure F is inscribed in figure G” means precisely the same thing as “figure G is circumscribed about figure F”. A circle or ellipse inscribed in a convex polygon (or a sphere or ellipsoid inscribed in a convex polyhedron) is tangent to every side of the outer figure (but see Inscribed sphere for semantic variants). A polygon inscribed in a circle, ellipse, or polygon (or a polyhedron inscribed in a sphere, ellipsoid, or polyhedron) has each vertex on the outer figure; if the outer figure is a polygon or polyhedron, there must be a vertex of the inscribed polygon or polyhedron on each side of the outer figure. Familiar examples include circles inscribed in triangles or regular polygons, and triangles or regular polygons inscribed in circles. Read more on – Wikipedia

Video on Inscribed and Circumscribed

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