Lewis Acids and Bases

The term Lewis acid refers to a definition of acid published by Gilbert N. Lewis in 1923, specifically: An acid substance is one which can employ an electron lone pair from another molecule in completing the stable group of one of its own atoms. Thus, H+ is a Lewis acid, since it can accept a lone pair, completing its stable form, which requires two electrons.
A Lewis base, then, is any species that donates a pair of electrons to a Lewis acid to form a Lewis adduct. For example, OH− and NH3 are Lewis bases, because they can donate a lone pair of electrons. Read more on – Wikipedia

Video on Lewis Acids and Bases

Credit Khan Academy

Leave a Reply